Indigenous People

When this part of the country was first being explored, the natives who were already here were Nahathaways. In 1797, David Thompson, an explorer and mapmaker who was then in the employ of the North-West Company, travelled through this area, living with the Nahathaways and learning their language.

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Danny Johnson

Danny Johnson has been honoured in Winnipegosis with a bulletin board telling of his career as a professional hockey player.

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Ukrainian Immigrants

The Ukrainian immigrants brought many skills with them to this area. Enticed by the offer of 160 acres for $10, many were attracted by land along creeks, rivers and the lakeshore. Easy access to water for their livestock, gardens and personal use was important.

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Peter McArthur

Peter McArthur, who owned and operated the first lumbering industry on Lake Winnipegosis, had an important part to play in the quelling of the Northwest Rebellion, which broke out in the spring of 1885. He had the contract to take three boats up to Grand Rapids from Lake Winnipeg to Cedar Lake.

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Mike Kostyk

Mike Kostyk left his home in Bukovina, Austria, for Canada in 1901 at the age of 20. After 14 years in Ontario, he settled in Winnipegosis in 1915.

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Icelandic Settlement

It began in 1897 when a group of Icelanders settled in the town of Winnipegosis from various localities. In 1899, a group from Pembina added to the population and by 1900 there were about 100 people here. At first they settled in the town of Winnipegosis. In 1900 the population shifted to Red Deer Point (Township 35, Range 18 West of the Principal Meridian) about 26 miles north of the town.

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Grenon Fox Ranch

Joseph P. Grenon, manager of the Armstrong Trading Co. at Winnipegosis situated on the banks of the river ¼ mile from town.

Mr. Grenon’s farm was the largest of its kind in Canada at that time.

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The Soldier Piper

This photo of World War I Veteran, Mr. Ferguson, was taken on the Winnipegosis station platform. The sign to the left reads” Great North Western Cable Office”…

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Sopilka Dancers

With the influx of Ukrainian immigrants, their vibrant culture soon became woven into the daily fabric of this area. A dramatic Ukrainian society was formed in the early 1900’s as well as dance groups.

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