Friday, September 16, 2022 at 2 pm

Come join us at the Winnipegosis Museum Grounds

Free tours, Refreshments and Entertainment! Bring a lawn chair!

This building has witnessed so much of the history of this area! Can you imagine the excitement of the train’s first arrival here with goods from all over Canada!

In the museum we have a picture of the train’s first official arrival! The station building was new and the people standing there are dressed in the fashion of the late 1897. The platform extended over the street that now runs by it!

As I work and research in the museum I am often struck by the thought of the courage, tenacity and hope that must have filled the hearts of people as they came off the train to start a new life here.

I also reflect on how the train would have affected our Indigenous people. They were now able to take their goods directly to different markets. They could travel to relatives who lived in communities near the railways.

The coming of the railway changed so much.

Membership
To commemorate the 125th year of the Winnipegosis CN Station, we are offering memberships for the 2022 season.

The coming of the Railway

In 1889, the Lake Manitoba Railway and Canal Company was formed and a charter received to develop the resources of Lake Winnipegosis. This charter was later sold to William MacKenzie and Donald Mann, who on January 29th, 1896, took possession of the Lake Manitoba and Canal Company. Railway service to Winnipegosis was first made available October 8, 1897, when the railway line was opened from Sifton. On December 20, 1898, this line became part of the Canadian Northern Railway, which in 1918, amalgamated into the Canadian National Railway System.

Excerpt from The Daily Nor’-Wester
Morning Edition, Saturday,
October 30, 1897
CN Station prior to 1914
Illustration of the address presented to the Premiere, Winnipegosis, 1897

Railway service to Winnipegosis was first made available October 8th, 1897, when the railway line was opened from Sifton. On December 20, 1898, this line became part of the Canadian Northern Railway, which in 1918 amalgamated into the great Canadian National Railway System.

The station building, or depot, was erected the latter part of 1897 and was listed by the Canadian Northern Railway as a “Type A” structure, containing all services, as well as accommodation for the agent and his family.

“Type A” was the earliest Canadian Northern standard design. Of more than 900 depots built for the Canadian Northern and Canadian National, only nine were “Type A’s” and all were in Manitoba.

This style of depot had a hip gable roof over the first storey and another over the second storey, giving the roof a rounded appearance. The building had a shingled awning supported by brackets which served to protect freight, and passengers waiting for the train. In the agent’s office was a large bay window facing the platform. Above were two windows in the second storey.

Inside, the ground floor was divided into a waiting room, an office, and a living room. The kitchen and dining room were in an addition attached to the rear of the building. A second addition contained the freight room. There were three bedrooms.